Monday, January 01, 2007

A sampling of Harry Truman: OUR FOREIGN POLICY 1952

This is not my regular weekly column. In fact, I have no intention of submitting it to the Daily Review Atlas, in part because the paper is not prepared to print graphics on their op-ed page.

To start off the new year, I thought I'd give a little history lesson, from 55 years ago.

It all began, for me, at an auction, where I bought a stack of books and pamphlets for... well, very cheap. In the midst of the children's literature from the 1920s (with all their plump apple cheeks and Kewpie Doll poses), sticking out like a cactus in a field of zinnias was this little pamphlet:


It was in fairly good condition -- only a slight amount of warping over the years.


But I confess, the one thing I found most intriguing for its endurance against the ravages of time was not the paper, or the style of illustration, but the message (click any image for larger version).




I intend to post passages from this pamphlet as the opportunity permits... and I hope the Federal government won't have me up on charges for something that's possibly still protected under copyright laws. I just thought it deserved to be brought up for air, at least once more.

As I make available the chapters in this 80-page booklet, I will link them below, according to the titles from the table of contents.

Table of contents:
FOREWORD [see above images]
THE ROOTS OF OUR FOREIGN POLICY
WHO MAKES FOREIGN POLICY?
HOW CAN A NATION BE SECURE?
THE TRUMAN DOCTRINE
THE NORTH ATLANTIC AREA
GERMANY
INTER-AMERICAN SECURITY
SECURITY IN ASIA AND THE PACIFIC
KOREA
SECURITY IN THE NEAR EAST
ECONOMIC WELL-BEING
POINT FOUR
MUTUAL SECURITY PROGRAM
NATIONAL DEFENSE
THE UNITED NATIONS AS A PEACE ORGANIZATION
DISARMAMENT
THE CAMPAIGN OF TRUTH
RIGHTS OF MEN AND NATIONS
THE CHALLENGE

2 comments:

Publius said...

No worries. My understanding is that all government publications are in the public domain.

leucanthemum b said...

Thanks. That was my understanding, as well, but I've been known to be wrong before. I just figured that, even if I were wrong, it was still worth the risk.